Vice Squad.

Reflections: Vice Squad’s Beki Bondage discusses the past and their latest EP, .

Earlier this month, in the midst of the UK’s lock down to prevent Covid-19, English punk band Vice Squad released a new EP titled Originally formed in 1979, this latest offering shows they are fresh as ever, having lost none of their passion to either time or commercialism.

An excellent collection of four bone-crunching songs that were mixed entirely in their home studio, each track showcases lead singer Beki Bondage strong vocals against the powerful guitar riffs of long-time member Paul Rooney. Bassist Wayne Firefly and a few different drummers comprise a tight foundational rhythm section on which Bondage and Rooney construct songs as solid as brick shithouse. Each one is curvaceous, muscular and appealing.

Lyrically, Bondage’s keen intellect and observational skills stand front and centre. The title track–the best of the bunch–features a catchy main riff and reflects on the anger and passion of youth and how it changes as we grow older. and are equally solid pogo fodder and lament on the problems of modern technology and life in the big city. playfully reverses gender roles, with Bondage singing about a male who wears make-up the way a male singer would normally sing about a lady he met at a gig. The song plays broadly enough to archetypes and events that play out on any given night at a punk club in London that the gender of the person in question hardly matters. Unable to play live during the lock down, Ms. Bondage addressed this question and several others in an interview conducted via e-mail.

Walk me through the genesis of how you develop new songs. Does one person handle all the lyrics or it is collaborative with both words and music?

The song looks back at the life of a young skinhead who has lost his rebellious streak. When you both look back to your youths, what do you think has changed about you the most?

There are a lot of articles written about how being young today is a lot different from what it was for our generation. In terms of the music business, what is the biggest change in the music industry you’ve seen since you were 17.

confronts the dangers of evolving technology to humans. Some of the technology arguably makes it easier for artists to create at home and get their music to the world efficiently. This EP was entirely recorded at home. The mix is great. Compare the home studio process of recording/mixing vs. a commercial studio. Do you have a preference? I would imagine having complete control is both liberating and a lot of work!

Describe the technical process and specifically get into some detail on the video for

What’s next for Vice Squad, both short and long term?

If the quality of this EP is indicative of the what we’re in for when is released later this year, it’s going to make going to live gigs post-lockdown all the better.

The EP is available now for download, CD and vinyl at vicesquad.co.uk

Vice Squad’s latest EP.

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